The iPad - Unveiled by Steve Jobs

Steve Jobs unveils the iPad - but is it for everyone?

Let me say right away that I love everything about Macs – the iPhone, the laptops, the operating system. But as for the just-announced iPad, I’m not going to be rushing out to buy one.
It is fabulous to look at, probably great fun to use and can slip into a small shoulder bag to replace a much heavier laptop. And who needs a giant laptop screen these days? Not even professional photographers who like to look at their pictures on a large scale – if they want to check out sharpness they need only to enlarge the picture.
As a writer, do I require a large screen? Even when I need to have two working windows open, one for source material and one for creating? No – I’ve always managed to squeeze in two windows on my 12in Powerbook G4 screen.
So why doesn’t the iPad appeal? At 9.6in the screen would still be fine with me, if I could split it, but my impression is that it can’t be done in any conventional way. There is a way around it, but I won’t go into that here. The problem for me is with the virtual keyboard. As a touch-typist I will have to look at the keys as I write because I can be guaranteed that without a tactile keyboard and with my eye away from the screen my fingers will drift and I’ll be typing gobble-gook (no rude comments, please). And if I have to keep my eye on the keys, what’s the point of being a touch typist? My work flow will slow down and surely the point of advanced technology is to speed it up.
On the photographic point of view, as my very fine photographer friend Cameron Laird points out, he is unlikely to be taking an iPad – and no other computer – with him on a professional assignment because he won’t be able to use the post-processing programmes Photoshop and Lightroom. While many people won’t necessarily need these programmes, professionals do, for resizing, tweaking colour casts and so on.
The iPad was larger than I expected. My personal feeling is that if you are going to fit one of those into your shoulder bag, you might as well be carrying around a slightly larger laptop. And, by the way, it’s possible to install a Mac operating system onto a Windows netbook and it will run very efficiently.
If I do upgrade by downsizing, if you follow my drift, I’m more likely to go for the netbook with Mac OS than I am to drop an iPad into my bag. But that’s my opinion.
Nice piece of equipment though.

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A couple find a quiet corner in Singapore's Raffles Hotel

A couple find a quiet corner in Singapore's Raffles Hotel

Johannes Gutenberg, of course, was the German inventor who in 1440 revolutionised the communications world with his printing press, a cumbersome machine that threatened to bring an end to pen and ink.

Why am I introducing this with a photo from Singapore? I’ll explain why below, suffice it to say that it helps to illustrate my point that our way of life does not have to change simply because a new form of communication enters the market place. We still need to think.
But back to Gutenberg for a moment. His printing press, along with that of William Caxton who introduced a similar method to England later, was to remain the prominent means of communication on a mass scale until the late 19th century.
Newspapers and book publishers used refined versions of their machines to transfer text and images onto paper. But pen and ink persisted.
Along the way, as the clunky printing presses were improved, came the typewriter, invented by Christopher Sholes and manufactured by the Remington Arms company in 1873. It was a revolution, speeding up office work and providing authors and journalists a means of producing readable text. Pen and ink remained, however.
And then, of course, came the computer. It killed off the typewriter as a tool for communicating and gave us all a speedy means of writing, along with unlimited access to information. I found its introduction a great asset when writing newspaper stories or books – no more telephoning libraries or hunting through thousands of cuttings to check out a fact. The information could be found in a flash.
The computer has become so popular that many turned to it as their main source of information. And as newspapers began feeding their stories to online readers – because their competitors were doing it and the public had come to expect it – sales of the printed newspapers began to fall.
Now the imminent announcement of a new form of computer from Apple is set to take communications further. There are predictions that it will be the nail in the coffin for newspapers, just as doomsayers are insisting that the introducing of devices like the Kindle digital reader will be the death of the printed book.
Despite these incredible advances, I still have to be convinced that all the things we love – pulling out a pocket book to read on a beach, spreading out a newspaper on the coffee table – will die. It’s very difficult to read any kind of screen in the sunlight and seeing people working at a laptop in a coffee shop just doesn’t seem right (even though I do it myself). And still pen and paper remain.
For all the great advances in technology we can’t live without our pen and paper. OK, emails have sounded the death knell for the old fashioned letter, but you still need a pen and paper to jot down the odd note. You can’t use a fancy digital voice recorder in a court room. You can’t do anything at all if the battery on your computer runs flat. Yes, you can write what appears to be a good book with the assistance of special programmes that correct your spelling and guide you into creating a grammatically correct sentence, but it doesn’t make you a writer.
Technology cannot do anything to change who we are, what we want, alter the intelligence, awareness, call it what you like, we were born with. Sit two people who  do not write for a living side by side, one with a pen and one with a computer, and ask them to compose, say 500 words about anything they wish. I’ll bet the computer writer turns out a very neat project, but I wonder if the person with the pen will have shown more heart in his or her words because he or she has had no technical assistance to call upon.
We still can’t live without our pen and paper, which has been with us for much longer than any mechanically or technically-produced text. It’s our fall-back when modern means fail.
The question, which no-one could have dreamed of asking a decade ago, is: are books and newspapers going to die? Some newspapers will – and have – and digital book readers will become popular but I believe the printed word, just like pen and ink, will persist. Books and newspapers will be able to live side by side with the computer, despite Apple’s fantastic advances. There are interesting times ahead.
But what has all this to do with my photo of Singapore? Well, stopping off in the island republic for a couple of days I was struck by the fact that just about every one of the thousands of tourists was carrying a camera (digital of course), some of them very expensive models. These advanced cameras have changed how the mechanical side of photography works. I watched as tourists pointed them at everything, pressed the shutter, assured that the camera would get the focusing and the exposure right. To hell with composition or finding a more interesting angle. Leave it all to the camera. Then they flew home with hundreds, perhaps thousands, of pictures on the memory card, all  perfectly exposed – but absolutely boring shots because no demands had been placed upon them to think: the camera was going to do that for them.
This is not a rave against technology. I love the advances, but there are areas of the world of communication that I believe will never die because there are people who believe that technological advances will never replace our ability to think. We need our in-hand newspapers not only to keep us in touch with what’s going on around us but also because you can read them anywhere at any time and keep on reading them for hours on end without the fear of a battery dying.
As for Singapore, I tried to be different. My simple camera could do it all, but a fine photograph needs a human brain to compose it. Hence, I decided to spend day photographing ‘circles and arches’ – a theme, a project, to make me work at it. Just as we have to work at clinging to a world of communications that is slipping away from us as technology takes over. Because there are some things we cannot do without – the feel of a book in our pocket, that newspaper in the coffee shop and, yes, a pen and paper.
Here are a few circles and arches from Singapore – and perhaps we, too, will go full circle one day and end up with pen and paper. Wait until the next power failure and see if I’m right.

A model poses in an arched walkway in Singapore

A model poses in an arched walkway in Singapore

Johannes Gutenberg, of course, was the German inventor who in 1440 revolutionised the communications world with his printing press, a cumbersome machine that threatened to bring an end to pen and ink.

Why am I introducing this with a photo from Singapore? I’ll explain why below, suffice it to say that it helps to illustrate my point that our way of life does not have to change simply because a new form of communication enters the market place. We still need to think.

But back to Gutenberg for a moment. His printing press, along with that of William Caxton who introduced a similar method to England later, was to remain the prominent means of communication on a mass scale until the late 20th century.

Newspapers and book publishers used refined versions of Gutenberg’s and Caxton’s machines to transfer text and images onto paper. But pen and ink persisted.

Along the way, as the clunky printing presses were improved, came the typewriter, invented by Christopher Sholes and manufactured by the Remington Arms company in 1873. It was a revolution, speeding up office work and providing authors and journalists a means of producing readable text. Pen and ink remained, however.

And then, of course, came the computer. It killed off the typewriter as a tool for communicating and gave us all a speedy means of writing, along with unlimited access to information. I found its introduction a great asset when writing newspaper stories or books – no more telephoning libraries or hunting through thousands of cuttings to check out a fact. The information could be found in a flash.

The computer has become so popular that many turned to it as their main source of information. And as newspapers began feeding their stories to online readers – because their competitors were doing it and the public had come to expect it – sales of the printed newspapers began to fall.

Now the imminent announcement of a new form of computer from Apple is set to take communications further. There are predictions that it will be the nail in the coffin for newspapers, just as doomsayers are insisting that the introducing of devices like the Kindle digital reader will be the death of the printed book.

Despite these incredible advances, I still have to be convinced that all the things we love – pulling out a pocket book to read on a beach, spreading out a newspaper on the coffee table – will die. It’s very difficult to read any kind of screen in the sunlight and seeing people working at a laptop in a coffee shop just doesn’t seem right (even though I do it myself). And still pen and paper remain.

For all the great advances in technology we can’t live without our pen and paper. OK, emails have sounded the death knell for the old fashioned letter, but you still need a pen and paper to jot down the odd note. You can’t use a fancy digital voice recorder in a court room. You can’t do anything at all if the battery on your computer runs flat. Yes, you can write what appears to be a good book with the assistance of special programmes that correct your spelling and guide you into creating a grammatically correct sentence, but it doesn’t make you a writer.

Technology cannot do anything to change who we are, what we want, alter the intelligence, awareness, call it what you like, we were born with. Sit two people who  do not write for a living side by side, one with a pen and one with a computer, and ask them to compose, say 500 words about anything they wish. I’ll bet the computer writer turns out a very neat project, but I wonder if the person with the pen will have shown more heart in his or her words because he or she has had no technical assistance to call upon.

We still can’t live without our pen and paper, which has been with us for much longer than any mechanically or technically-produced text. It’s our fall-back when modern means fail.

The question, which no-one could have dreamed of asking a decade ago, is: are books and newspapers going to die? Some newspapers will – and have – and digital book readers will become popular but I believe the printed word, just like pen and ink, will persist. Books and newspapers will be able to live side by side with the computer, despite Apple’s fantastic advances. There are interesting times ahead.

But what has all this to do with my photo of Singapore? Well, stopping off in the island republic for a couple of days I was struck by the fact that just about every one of the thousands of tourists was carrying a camera (digital of course), some of them very expensive models. These advanced cameras have changed how the mechanical side of photography works. I watched as tourists pointed them at everything, pressed the shutter, assured that the camera would get the focusing and the exposure right. To hell with composition or finding a more interesting angle. Leave it all to the camera. Then they flew home with hundreds, perhaps thousands, of pictures on the memory card, all  perfectly exposed – but absolutely boring shots because no demands had been placed upon them to think: the camera was going to do that for them.

This is not a rave against technology. I love the advances, but there are areas of the world of communication that I believe will never die because there are people who believe that technological advances will never replace our ability to think. We need our in-hand newspapers not only to keep us in touch with what’s going on around us but also because you can read them anywhere at any time and keep on reading them for hours on end without the fear of a battery dying.

As for Singapore, I tried to be different. My simple camera could do it all, but a fine photograph needs a human brain to compose it. Hence, I decided to spend day photographing ‘circles and arches’ – a theme, a project, to make me work at it. Just as we have to work at clinging to a world of communications that is slipping away from us as technology takes over. Because there are some things we cannot do without – the feel of a book in our pocket, that newspaper in the coffee shop and, yes, a pen and paper.

Here’s another circular sample from Singapore (others are in the photo gallery) – and perhaps we, too, will go full circle one day and end up with pen and paper. Wait until the next power failure and see if I’m right.

A food court in Singapore.

A food court in Singapore.

Hyde Park London - More Like Hidden Park (under snow)

Hyde Park London - More Like Hidden Park (under snow)

Following on from my black & white Picture of the Week (below) I apologise for yet another colourless offering – but you can blame Britain’s weather. I arrived in London to a blizzard, when the temperature at Heathrow Airport was zero. When I left Sydney it was hovering around 40c. I didn’t want to get off the plane!

I’d moved to Australia 30 or so years ago and had come to enjoy the heat. British winters became a distant memory, particularly as on each return visit I’d made sure to arrive in summer. This time a very close journalist friend was leaving his esteemed position on the Daily Mail and it was only right that I should buy him a farewell beer. I only wish he’d decided to leave during the summer months!

In any case, I went for a wander through the city, braving the blizzard and found myself in Hyde Park. I’ve never seen it so empty – a few ducks and a couple of brave souls standing beside an abandoned snowman summed up the decision by the entire city, it seemed, to stay indoors.

I grabbed this picture with my iPhone before the wintry shakes took hold. Then I went back to my hotel where an item on the news featured surfers enjoying the sun in Sydney. Sigh…..

 
Curious Scene on a Volcano

Curious Scene on a Volcano

I ask ‘what on earth?’ because this photographer was only just on earth – on the top of Japan’s Mt Aso volcano, the biggest volcano in Japan and one of the largest in the world.

I took the picture back in the 1970s while travelling with my trusty Olympus OM1, loaded with Tri-X black and white film, on the southern island of Kyushu, following in the footsteps of the great French photographer Henri Cartier-Bresson. Regarded as the father of modern photo-journalism, he captured a powerful picture of two men near the smoking rim of the volcano in 1965.

When I went there the volcano was pumping out so much ash visibility was down to just a few yards. I became lost in thick swirling white clouds on the mountain trail but then to my astonishment I came across this curious scene – a commercial photographer, protected from the billowing ash by a plastic poncho, waiting for tourists who might want their photo taken. As you can imagine, there appeared to be no-one on the mountain but the photographer and me. We nodded to one another, I took his picture, he didn’t take mine, and I made my way slowly back to ground level.

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